Make the Best Decision: A Free Tool for Teachers and Students

It is an understatement to say that I've learned a lot from my dad. He can fix anything. I have this great memory of coming home from school to my dad sitting on the floor surrounded by the washing machine in about 1,000 pieces and thinking to myself, "There is no way this is ending well." I won't act like I didn't hear any choice words whispered under his breath, but somehow the next day that washing machine was working like new. 
As a Father's Day tribute, this post explains dad's decision-making philosophy with a free tool to help you practice making the best decisions and teach your students to do the same. Apply this concept and tool to the real-world or the classroom!

In terms of his role in my life, he was (and still is) my coach, counselor, financial planner, mechanic, contractor, and for lack of a better term, my hero. Without getting too sentimental, I'd like to share one of the most important life tools that I learned from my dad: the Pro Con List. 


As a Father's Day tribute, this post explains dad's decision-making philosophy with a free tool to help you practice making the best decisions and teach your students to do the same. Apply this concept and tool to the real-world or the classroom!


It seems so simple, but it really has guided my decision making since I was a little girl. I'm not saying that you should make a pro con list for every decision (i.e. it's not really necessary or advised to use it for deciding what to order at a restaurant). However, for important decisions, it has really, really helped me. 


I love it so much that I even created the "pretty" version you see above to use in my classroom (for reading and counselling). You can download it for free here. I print off a bunch and have them in my classroom in case a student comes to me with a difficult decision (e.g. What college should I go to?, Should I take AP next year?, etc.). I also use it as during reading and after reading activities. For example, when after reading part I of Antigone by Sophocles, I ask students to assume the role of Creon, the antagonist in the tragic Greek play. I ask them to complete a Pro Con list for Creon's big decision: should he or shouldn't he punish his niece, Antigone, for disobeying his edict? The students use the Pro Con list to determine what Creon should do. At the conclusion of the story, we revisit their Pro Con list and discuss what Creon should have or could have done differently based on their judgments. Not only are they addressing higher-order thinking skills, but the students are also learning and important life skill: decision making. As you can tell, the Pro Con List is a big time winner in my book.


As a Father's Day tribute, this post explains dad's decision-making philosophy with a free tool to help you practice making the best decisions and teach your students to do the same. Apply this concept and tool to the real-world or the classroom!

Here's why I love it:

  1. It requires higher order thinking. Evaluating a decision and potential outcomes is one of the highest thinking skills on Bloom's Taxonomy. 
  2. A Pro Con list makes the abstract, concrete. Decision making (and thinking in general) are abstract. However, once you put potential outcomes and realities on paper, it becomes concrete, hence helping you make better decisions.
  3. It's universal. If you can write, you can do a Pro Con list. Adults and children alike can benefit from this practice.
  4. You have a record of what you were thinking long after the decision is relevant. I found a Pro Con list that I made years ago when I decided to go to pursue my doctorate in education instead of law school. Not only is it interesting to see how far you've come from that decision, but it is also validating to remember why you made that decision.
  5. It really does help you make the best decision, and even if it doesn't work out perfectly, at least you know you made an informed decision.

Happy Father's Day to one awesome dad! I love you!

As a Father's Day tribute, this post explains dad's decision-making philosophy with a free tool to help you practice making the best decisions and teach your students to do the same. Apply this concept and tool to the real-world or the classroom!

Best of luck with your next decision!


As a Father's Day tribute, this post explains dad's decision-making philosophy with a free tool to help you practice making the best decisions and teach your students to do the same. Apply this concept and tool to the real-world or the classroom!





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